The Skinny on Milk Paint

 

Been thinking about trying milk paint? Here are my five top tips for milk paint:

1. If you want that super chippy look the surface you are painting over needs to be sealed. That means if you are painting a piece that you just sanded and stained you should add a sealer (poly is best for this application) before you paint it. You can use a poly that is less shiny so you still get that aged feel when your piece is complete but if you paint the newly stained surface without a sealed surface it will bond pretty well to the surface and you won't get the chippy look you're after. If you don't want too much chipping add a little Extra Bond to keep that paint in place.

 

2. Remember with milk paint, at least for the mix-as-you-go paints, you need to use all the paint that you mix. It won't keep. I have been able to keep it in a sealed container in the fridge for a couple days but beyond that it is toast. That means you need to have a few things ready to paint before you mix. I try to have a few smalls in addition to the furniture so if there is paint left after I do the furniture I can slap a coat on the smalls too.

 

3. Milk paint needs to be mixed well. I have an immersion blender that I use just for milk paint. You can get a cheap one for about $15 on Amazon. You don't need a fancy one so don't spend a bunch of money. For once, cheap is just fine!

 

4. Once you get your piece painted (sometimes you need two coats - darker colors seem to cover a little better than lighter colors), you will need to sand. Use a 220 or greater sand paper and a light touch until you get the texture and look you are striving for.

 

5. Once your piece painted, sanded and all prettied up give it a good seal. I like soft wax for milk painted services but if you know your surface will get heavy use (think dining room table) you should use something more heavy duty like a poly.

 


Older Post Newer Post


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published